This will play a video - Renal denervation (RDN) patient with family, after Medtronic high blood pressure (HBP) treatment and hypertension (HTN) management.

IDENTIFYING POTENTIAL PATIENTS FOR RENAL DENERVATION

SELECT IDEAL PATIENTS FOR RDN

Patients who may be candidates for renal denervation (RDN) tend to fall into one of three groups. Typically, these patients are open to a balanced conversation about RDN that takes their preferences into account.

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DIFFICULT TO CONTROL

Patients who take multiple anti - hypertensive medications and are rigorously adherent —  yet still not able to control their blood pressure — are often ready for a different treatment approach. Quite simply, they know medications are not providing the results they want.

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UNWILLING OR UNABLE TO ADHERE

The more medications a patient takes, the lower their adherence.1,2,3 Non-adherence doubles when patients move from two to three pills.1,2,3 These factors may explain why nearly half of patients become non-adherent within one year.4

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MOTIVATED

Factors driving preference for RDN tend to be associated with how clearly the patient understands the benefits of blood pressure reduction. These factors include:

  • Personal experiences have made high blood pressure consequences real
  • Perceive high blood pressure as a significant risk
  • BP medication side effects have negatively impacted their lives

RENAL DENERVATION PATIENT SELECTION COURSE

PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF RDN PATIENT SELECTION

A three-part series from Radcliffe Medical Education* about RDN in patients with resistant hypertension. CME accredited.

REGISTER FOR THE COURSE
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RENAL DENERVATION CLINICAL CASE DISCUSSION

REAL-WORLD EXPERIENCE OF RDN

Prof. Markus Schlaich discusses safety, efficacy and patient selection insights from the largest study of renal denervation.

WATCH PRESENTATION

RDN AND UNCONTROLLED HYPERTENSION

Prof. Markus Schlaich discusses GLOBAL SYMPLICITY REGISTRY data on RDN in patients with resistant hypertension.

WATCH NOW

To see more videos visit the videos and presentations page.

NEW DATA ON PATIENT PREFERENCE

A new article published in the Journal of Hypertension shows that patients with hypertension may see RDN differently than physicians. It explains why many of these patients, including those who are not currently taking anti-hypertensive medications, may prefer RDN as a way to reduce their blood pressure.1

GUIDELINES FOR RENAL DENERVATION

As RDN gains momentum worldwide, more medical societies are developing guidelines for patient selection.  Guidelines may change as new clinical data emerge.

RDN AND UNCONTROLLED HYPERTENSION

Prof. Roland Schmieder and Prof. TD Wang discuss patient selection, non-adherence, and the role of patient preference.

WATCH NOW

PATIENT SELECTION INSIGHT

Prof. Isabella Sudano discusses which patients are best suited for RDN with the Symplicity SpyralTM RDN system, including how to incorporate patient preference.

SEE INSIGHTS

RENAL DENERVATION: PUTTING GUIDELINES INTO PRACTICE

Prof. Tzung-Dau Wang and Dr. Flavio Ribichini present patient selection factors.

GUIDELINES AND CONSENSUS STATEMENTS FOR RENAL DENERVATION

European Society of Cardiology and European Society of Hypertension2,3

The Task Force for the management of arterial hypertension of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Society of Hypertension (ESH) jointly developed guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension, which cover patient selection for RDN. 

Italian Position Paper on difficult-to-treat hypertension patients4

Published by the Italian Society of Arterial Hypertension (SIIA), the Italian position paper includes a flowchart to identify which difficult-to-treat patients should be considered for renal denervation. These guidelines propose a “dynamic definition” of the difficult-to-treat hypertension patient.

Taiwan Hypertension Society and Taiwan Society of Cardiology5

The Taiwan Hypertension Society (THS) and Taiwan Society of Cardiology (TSC) issued a consensus statement on RDN, acknowledging that the procedure may benefit patient groups in addition to those with resistant hypertension. They also developed a patient selection tool.

Asia Renal Denervation Consortium (ARDEC)6

The Asia Renal Denervation Consortium (ARDeC) consensus conference published recommendations on renal denervation (RDN) to help inform healthcare professionals in Asia. It includes five key questions to ask when considering RDN as a treatment option for hypertension.

The procedure has given me peace of mind and a new lease on life. I can’t ask for anything more.

- Gael, Hypertensive patient whose blood pressure has been under control for more than 10 years after receiving RDN.
Medtronic patient who utilizes hypertension (HTN) management and high blood pressure (HBP) treatments.

RDN isn't suitable for all patients. Individual patient outcomes may vary.

TEST YOUR HTN IQ

See how much you know about the prevalence and risks of hypertension.

TAKE THE QUIZ

COULD RDN HELP YOUR PATIENTS?

Get in touch with our team to discuss your hypertensive patients and how RDN could help them.

CONTACT US

EXTENSIVE CLINICAL EVIDENCE

The Medtronic RDN system has more published findings and patient-years of follow-up than any other RDN technology.9

SEE THE RESULTS

EXPLORE THE SYSTEM

The Symplicity Spyral™ multi-electrode renal denervation catheter is part of the Medtronic Renal Denervation system.

DISCOVER THE SYMPLICITY SPYRAL™ SYSTEM

Connect with a Medtronic representative

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*

Radcliffe Cardiology is part of Radcliffe Medical Media, an independent publisher and the Radcliffe Group Ltd. is neither affiliated with, nor is an agent of, the Oxford Heart, the Oxford Heart Centre, the John Radcliffe Hospital or the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust group.

1

Schmieder R, Kandzari D, Wang TD, et. al. Differences in patient and physician perspectives on pharmaceutical therapy and renal denervation for the management of hypertension. Journal of Hypertension: August 06, 2020 - Volume Publish Ahead of Print - Issue - doi:10.1097/HJH.0000000000002592

2

Williams B, Mancia G, Spiering W, et al. 2018 ESC/ESH Guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension: The Task Force for the management of arterial hypertension of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Society of Hypertension (ESH). European Heart Journal, Volume 39, Issue 33, 01 September 2018, Pages 3021–3104, https://doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehy339.

3

Schmieder RE, Mahfoud F, Azizi M, et al. European Society of Hypertension position paper on renal denervation 2018. Journal of Hypertens. 2018 Oct;36(10):2042-2048.

4

Bruno RM, Taddei S, Borghi C, et al. Italian Society of Arterial Hypertension (SIIA) Position Paper on the Role of Renal Denervation in the Management of the Difficult-to-Treat Hypertensive Patient. High Blood Press Cardiovasc Prev. 2020; 27: 109–117.

5

Wang TD, Lee YH, Chang SS, et. al. 2019 Consensus Statement of the Taiwan Hypertension Society and the Taiwan Society of Cardiology on Renal Denervation for the Management of Arterial Hypertension. Acta Cardiologica Sinica. 2019;35:199-230.

6

Kazuomi K, Byeong-Keuk K, Jiro A, et al. Renal Denervation in Asia: Consensus Statement of the Asia Renal Denervation
Consortium. Hypertension 75(3), February 2020. DOI: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.119.13671.

7

As of June 2021, Medtronic data on file.