Healthcare Professionals

O-ARM SURGICAL IMAGING SYSTEM

For Spine, Orthopaedic Trauma, and Neurological Procedures

Overview

The O-armTM system is an intraoperative 2D/3D imaging system that is designed to meet the workflow demands of the surgical environment. It can be used in variety of procedures including spine, cranial, and orthopedics.

O-ARM UNIQUE AND UNMATCHED

Over the last 16 years, O-arm and StealthStation™ Navigation have revolutionized surgery. Discover why O-arm is the market-leading imaging solution in spinal surgery.

 

Latest news

A COMPLETE SOLUTION FOR SPINAL SURGERY

Today more than 400 scientific papers7 show the high interest of the medical community in this solution and testify the clinical and economic benefits of O-arm™ intraoperative imaging and StealthStation™ navigation. The clinical and economical value guide summarizes the facts. Download the value summary below.

INDICATIONS

The O-arm O2 Imaging System is a mobile x-ray system designed for 2D fluoroscopic and 3D imaging for adult and pediatric patients weighing 27kg or greater and having an abdominal thickness greater than 16cm, and is intended to be used where a physician benefits from 2D and 3D information of anatomic structures and objects with high x-ray attenuation such as bony anatomy and metallic objects. The O-arm O2 Imaging System is compatible with certain image guided surgery systems.

PRODUCT DETAILS

The O-arm system’s high quality, versatile imaging provides the information you need to guide your clinical decision making.

ADVANCED SURGICAL SOLUTIONS

Along with StealthStation navigation, the O-arm system provides enhanced 3D visibility and surgical feedback. It also:

  • Provides current patient data in the OR
  • Enables advanced surgical approaches like MIS
  • Provides additional information in challenging procedures, like heavier patients or patients with unusual anatomy1,2,3
  • Automatic registration keeps the process simple

The O-arm system also offers options for workflow efficiencies, such as:

  • In procedures where pre-op axial/coronal/sagittal slice data is necessary, it may be possible to use the O-arm system to provide the initial data set
  • Eliminating the need to send patients to be scanned in radiology
Standard workflow in an OR compared to O-arm workflow

IMAGING PROTOCOLS

The O-arm system provides flexibility for surgeons to achieve As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). Multiple image protocols allow the surgeon flexibility to choose the appropriate dose to the patient based upon individual clinical objectives.4

O-arm system standard dose protocol

O-arm system low dose protocol (50% less dose)

OPPORTUNITIES TO REDUCE DOSE

With opportunities to reduce dose to the surgeon and staff, the O-arm and StealthStation systems eliminate the need to wear lead protective apparel during the navigated steps of the procedure.5,6

SURGICAL WORKFLOW

The O-arm system has been designed to complement the surgical workflow with:

  • Multiple surgical table options
  • Inter-room mobility for concurrent cases
  • On-demand imaging, no need to schedule in advance

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

CATEGORY

SPECIFICATION

PHYSICAL DIMENSIONS

Length

252 cm gantry door open

Width

81.3 cm

Height

198 cm gantry door closed (can be lowered)

Weight

885kg approx.

Gantry Opening

69.9 cm

Bore Diameter

96.5 cm

View the Technical Specification Guide for more information on:

  • Imaging Modality Performance
  • Robotic Motion Controls
  • Environmental and Power Specs
  • X-ray Assembly

CONTACT US FOR MORE INFORMATION

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BRIEF STATEMENT

See the device manual for detailed information regarding the instructions for use, indications, contraindications, warnings, precautions, and potential adverse events. For further information, contact your local Medtronic representative and/or consult the Medtronic website at medtronic.eu
 
 

References

1

Kovanda TJ, Ansari SF, Qaiser R, Fulkerson DH. Feasibility of CT-based intraoperative 3D stereotactic image-guided navigation in the upper cervical spine of children 10 years of age or younger: initial experience. J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2015;16(5):1-9. 

2

Liu Y, Li X, Sun H, Yang H, Jiang W. Transpedicular wedge osteotomy for treatment of kyphosis after L1 fracture using intraoperative, full rotation, three-dimensional image (O-arm)-based navigation: a case report. Int J Clin Exp Med. 2015;8(10):18889-18893.

3

Houten JK, Nasser R, Baxi N. Clinical assessment of percutaneous lumbar pedicle screw placement using the O-arm multidimensional surgical imaging system. Neurosurgery. 2012 Apr; 70(4):990-5

4

Dosimetry_Report_O2_BI-160-00227_Rev_2

5

Nottmeier E.W., Bowman C., Nelson K.L. Surgeon radiation exposure in cone beam computed tomography-based, image-guided spinal surgery. Int J Med Robot. 2012 Jun;8(2):196-200   

6

Pitteloud N, Gamulin A, Barea C, Damet J, Racloz G, Sans-Merce M. Radiation exposure using the O-arm® surgical imaging system. European Spine Journal JO - Eur Spine J. 2017;26(3):651-657.  

7

Medtronic internal document: 10501 O-arm Journal Database - All Applications Q4FY21

Campaign References

1

Van de Kelft E, Costa F, Van der Planken D, Schils F. A Prospective Multicenter Registry on the Accuracy of Pedicle Screw Placement in the Thoracic, Lumbar, and Sacral Levels With the Use of the O-arm Imaging System and StealthStation Navigation. Spine 2012;37(25):E1580-7.

2

Burch S, et al. Comparison of radiation exposure to the spine surgeon during pedicle screw placement using the O-arm System and StealthStation Navigation vs. C-arm Standard fluoroscopy. 2010

3

Silbermann J, Riese F, Allam Y, Reichert T, Koeppert H, GutberletM. Computer tomography assessment of pedicle screw placement in lumbar and sacral spine: comparison between free-hand and O-arm based navigation techniques. Eur Spine J 2011;20(6):875-81.

4

Shin MH, Ryu KS, Park CK. Accuracy and safety in pedicle screw placement in the thoracic and lumbar spines: Comparison study between conventional C-arm fluoroscopy and navigation coupled withO-arm (registered trademark) guided methods. J Korean Neurosurg Soc 2012;52(3):204-9.

5

 Allam Y, Silbermann J, Riese F, Greiner-Perth R. Computer tomography assessment of pedicle screw placement in thoracic spine: comparison between free hand and a generic 3D-based navigation techniques. Eur Spine J 2013;22:648-53

6

Shin, M.-H., Hur, J.-W., Ryu, K.-S., & Park, C.-K. Prospective Comparison Study between the Fluoroscopy-guided and Navigation Coupled withO-arm -Guided Pedicle Screw Placement in the Thoracic and Lumbosacral Spines. Journal of Spinal Disorders and Techniques. 2015. 28(6), E347–E351.

7

Verma, S. K., Singh, P. K., Agrawal, D., Sinha, S., Gupta, D., Satyarthee, G. D., & Sharma, B. S. (2016). O-arm with navigation versus C-arm: a reviewof screw placement over 3 years at a major trauma center. British Journal of Neurosurgery, 1–4.

8

Dea, N., Fisher, C. G., Batke, J., Strelzow, J., Mendelsohn, D., Paquette, S. J., … Street, J. T. (2016). Economic evaluation comparing intraoperative cone beamCT-based navigation and conventional fluoroscopy for the placement of spinal pedicle screws: A patient-level data cost-effectiveness analysis. Spine Journal, 16(1), 23–3